Translating references/Übersetzung von Arbeitszeugnissen

I’ve mentioned the complexities of German job references before. They have a sub-text. I suppose I would just translate fairly literally: zu unserer vollen Zufriedenheit would become to our complete satisfaction, which would give no clue that there is a more complimentary version, zu unserer vollsten Zufriedenheit.
Now e-fellows has an article (in German) on the problems of getting references for jobs in the USA, Canada or the UK (the three are, of course, lumped together).

In Deutschland lautet die Gesamtbewertung für ein sehr gutes Zeugnis immer: “Er/sie arbeitete stets zu unserer vollsten Zufriedenheit”. Zwar kann man diese Formel problemlos mit “He always worked to our fullest/utmost satisfaction” übersetzten. Allerdings werden im Englischen meist andere Beschreibungen bevorzugt (siehe unten). Grundsätzlich hat ein Arbeitszeugnis im Englischen eher den Charakter eines Empfehlungsschreibens.

The article continues with a recommendation to use a professional translator.

Wer nur ein deutsches Arbeitszeugnis bekommt, sollte stets beachten: Arbeitszeungisse immer professionell übersetzen lassen (Liste von Übersetzern siehe unten). Sonst könnte es passieren, das man so manchem “false friend” auf den Leim geht. Eine professionelle Übersetzung, das heißt eine Übesetzung von möglichst englischen Muttersprachlern mit guten Wirtschaftskenntnissen, kostet ab 100 Euro pro Zeugnis (siehe unten).

A professional translator is therefore one who avoids false friends – something rather hard for the client to tell. It’s pointed out that in an English reference, ‘His pleasant manner made him popular with the rest of the staff’ is intended as a compliment, whereas in a German reference it would be the opposite: I presume this is the kind of ‘false friend’ that is meant, although probably from the employee’s point of view, it would be more dangerous to translate into German than into English. The latter can at worst produce a reference that is too positive. Since the German employee has the right to a certain type of reference and has it in his or her possession, the door is open for obtaining wonderfully positive translations.

Here’s the e-fellows reference to professional translators:

Der Personalmanagement Service www.arbeitszeugnis.de/uebersetzung bietet Übersetzungen deutscher Arbeitszeugnisse von englischen Muttersprachlern an (Preis: ab 110 Euro).

They may well do a very good job, but what they offer is the conversion of a German Arbeitszeugnis into an English Letter of Reference / Recommendation. They will even let you fill out an application form and then create a letter of recommendation from nothing! This is translation to the power of ten:

# Übersetzung eines deutschen Arbeitszeugnisses in einen englischen Letter of Reference bzw. Letter of Recommendation (je nachdem, ob Sie Ihr Zeugnis für Ihre Unterlagen und zukünftigen Bewerbungen übersetzen lassen, oder sich zur Zeit auf eine konkrete Stelle bewerben und das Zeugnis somit an einen bestimmten Arbeitgeber richten, unterscheidet man zwischen einem Letter of Reference und einem Letter of Recommendation. Wir bieten beide Formen der Zeugnisübersetzung an): pauschal 110 € bei einem Umfang von max. 4000 Zeichen inkl. Leerzeichen, bei einem größeren Zeichenumfang werden pauschal 134 € berechnet)
# Neuerstellung eines englischen Letter of Reference bzw. Letter of Recommendation (ohne vorhandenes deutschsprachiges Zeugnis) auf Basis unseres Beurteilungsbogens für pauschal 160

€

This may well be excellent value for anyone applying for a job abroad. It also takes translation to new heights.

(Via Handakte WebLAWg)

4 thoughts on “Translating references/Übersetzung von Arbeitszeugnissen

  1. Margaret, thanks for pointing these out. It’s great to hear Franconian now and again – there just isn’t enough of it in Buckinghamshire.
    The second punchline involves nasal mucus (I had to listen three times).

  2. Ok, I believe this is the actual text:
    ‘ “Hams a a Kriegsleiden?” “Na”, hadder gsacht, “an Nasenpoppel der geht net wech.” ‘
    Doesn’t sound much of a joke when it’s written down – it’s the way he tells them.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.